Schedule of Events for Wear Orange Day, October 30

In solidarity with the Stop Mass Incarceration Network, Tennessee Students and Educators for Social Justice is calling on students and educators across the state to wear orange on October 30. Together with activists across the country, we endorse the following Pledge of Resistance:

What kind of society do you want to live in?

- Police brutality and police murder are daily occurrences, yet brutal murdering cops are almost never punished for their crimes;
– Black and Latino people, especially the youth, are treated like criminals, guilty until proven innocent, if they can survive to prove their innocence;
– This criminalization has led to 2.2 million people being warehoused in prison, a 500% increase over the past 30 years;
– Tens of thousands of people in prison are subjected to the torture of long term solitary confinement;
– Alongside this has risen a program of criminalizing and incarcerating undocumented immigrants;
– The color of a person’s skin determines whether they live and how they live.

Today we pledge:

Black lives matter.
Latino lives matter.
All lives matter.

* Mass incarceration: WE SAY NO MORE!

* Police murder: WE SAY NO MORE!

* Torture in the prisons: WE SAY NO MORE!

* Criminalization of generations: WE SAY NO MORE!

* Attacks on immigrants: WE SAY NO MORE!

We will NOT be silent.

We WILL resist!

Until these shameful horrors really are… NO MORE!

 

Schedule of Events in Nashville

Wear orange all day long!

11am-1pm – Imagine a World Without Prisons (Collaborative Art Project)

Outside Rand Dining Hall, Vanderbilt University

1pm – Rally and Discussion of Mass Incarceration

Outside Rand Dining Hall, Vanderbilt University

4 – 6:30pm – Nightmare on Our Street: Teach-In on Racialized Violence

Vanderbilt Divinity School, Reading Room

The Vanderbilt Divinity School in conjunction with the Graduate Department of Religion and Vanderbilt Black Seminarians will host “Nightmare on Our Street!: A Teach-in On Racialized Violence in America” on Thursday, October 30th from 4-6:30PM in the Reading Room located in the Divinity School. This teach-in seeks, through a religious lens, to analyze, critique, and respond to the racialized violence inflicted on communities of color and the systems and structures that reinforce institutionalized racism. Panelists will include Mr. Keron Blair, Campaign Strategist and Field Director at Raise IL, Ms. Darria Janéy Hudson, Multicultural Youth Organizer at Tennessee Immigrant and Refugee Coalition, Rev. Dr. Christophe D. Ringer, Visiting Assistant Professor of Religion and Philosophy at Christian Brothers University, Dr. Stacey Floyd-Thomas, Associate Professor of Ethics and Society, Rev. Mark Forrester, University Chaplain and Director of Religious Life at Vanderbilt University, and August Washington, Associate Vice Chancellor and Chief of Vanderbilt Police Department. Dr. Herbert Marbury, Associate Professor of Hebrew Bible, will serve as moderator.

7:30 pm – “Void of Grace: Mass Incarceration in the State of TN”

Lipscomb University, Swang Business Building, Stowe Hall (Room 108 – there will be signs)

 

Photo Gallery: Rally to Stop Executions, September 15

Photography by Luke Myers.

Photo Gallery: Nashville Teach-In, September 13

Photos from the Teach-In on Mass Incarceration and the Death Penalty at the Nashville Public Library, September 13, 2014.  Photography by Luke Myers.

Coverage of Nashville Teach-In and Rally

Thanks to everyone who participated in the Nashville Teach-In on Mass Incarceration and the Death Penalty, and the Rally to Stop Executions!  Here’s some media coverage of the two events:

Coverage of the Teach-In:

“’Teach-in’ takes on death penalty, judicial system,” The Tennessean, http://www.tennessean.com/story/news/local/2014/09/14/teach-takes-death-penalty-judicial-system/15606227/

“Group calling for change to prisons and death penalty,” Fox 17 News, http://www.fox17.com/news/features/top-stories/stories/group-calling-change-prisons-death-penaltymikayla-lewis-23494.shtml

Coverage of the Rally:

“Activists hold rally in downtown Nashville to protest death penalty (Live Coverage),”  WSMV Channel 4 News, http://www.wsmv.com/Clip/10585551/activists-hold-rally-in-downtown-nashville-to-protest-death-penalty?fb_action_ids=10203242480876035&fb_action_types=og.recommends&fb_ref=.VBg12x8AReI.like

“Rally protesting executions in TN held in downtown Nashville,”  WSMV Channel 4 News,  http://www.wsmv.com/story/26538868/rally-protesting-executions-in-tn-held-in-downtown-nashville

“Anti-death penalty protesters voice concerns on Capitol Hill,” WKRN-TV Channel 2 News, http://www.wkrn.com/story/26536945/anti-death-protesters-voice-concerns-on-tennessees-capitol-hill

Stay tuned for the follow-up to our Open Letter to Stop Executions!

#ImagineAbolition

Rally to Stop Executions – TODAY in Nashville!

Monday, Sept 15, 12 noon – 1pm

Legislative Plaza (corner of 6th and Charlotte)

Nashville, TN

As students and educators, we seek to understand the world and to share our understanding with others through a practice of critical thinking and responsible action.  Therefore, we cannot remain silent as Tennessee plans to execute people in the name of justice.

We call upon Governor Bill Haslam to suspend all scheduled executions immediately, and to commission a full and transparent review of capital punishment in Tennessee.

Today at noon, Tennessee Students and Educators for Social Justice will send a delegation to deliver our Open Letter to Governor Haslam, asking him to stop currently-scheduled executions and to conduct a full and transparent review of Tennessee’s death penalty system.

Come out and support our delegation!  Bring signs to express your views and banners to represent your school, college, community group, or congregation.

Sept 13 Teach-in Poster

 

Nashville Teach-In on Mass Incarceration and the Death Penalty: Event Schedule

Saturday, Sept. 13, 10 am – 4:30 pm

Nashville Public Library, Conference Center

615 Church St, Nashville, TN 37219

Directions and Parking Information

Facebook event page

10 – 10:15 am     Welcome

Auditorium

Activist Art Project: Imagine a World Beyond Prisons

- Carmela Hill-Burke, R.E.A.C.H. Coalition and Vanderbilt Philosophy

Participate in this project all day in the library’s art gallery, across from Room 1a/b!

10:15 – 11:15 am    Workshops

51 Years a Slave: The Lie of Truth and Sentencing Laws

- Reverend Jeannie Alexander

- Preston Shipp

- With contributions from men serving 51-year life sentences at Riverbend Maximum Security Prison

                Room 1a

SB 1391 and the Criminalization of Pregnancy Outcomes

- Hedy Weinberg, ACLU-TN Executive Director

- Thomas H. Castelli, ACLU-TN Legal Director

                Room 1b

School to Prison Pipeline

- Eric Brown, Lead Organizer, Children’s Defense Fund

                Room 2

Private Prisons for Fun and Profit, Mostly Profit

- Alex Friedmann, Managing Editor, Prison Legal News

    Room 3 Continue reading

TEN THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT TENNESSEE’S DEATH PENALTY

1. There are no rich people on death row

  • 85-90% of people on death row were financially unable to hire attorneys to represent them at trial. They are assigned public defenders with much higher caseloads and fewer resources than private law firms.
  • Public Defender’s offices in both Nashville and Memphis have reported chronic underfunding and understaffing, to the point of not being able to take on a new case (Memphis Commercial Appeal and TBA).

2. There are racial biases in the system

  • A study of capital sentencing in Tennessee from 1981 to 2000 found that defendants with white victims were 3.15 to 75 times more likely to receive the death penalty than defendants with black victims (ABA report, p 284).
  • More than 1 in 4 black inmates condemned to death in Tennessee from 1977 to 2001 were sentenced by all-white juries (Amnesty, p 40).

3. There is too little oversight and accountability for judges and lawyers in capital cases

  • A 2007 study by the American Bar Association found that the TN death penalty system falls short on 10 key points, including Inadequate Procedures to Address Innocence Claims, Lack of Meaningful Proportionality Review, and Failure to Preserve DNA Evidence in Capital Trials. These issues remain unresolved today (ABA report).
  • A prosecutor in Shelby County has been publicly reprimanded by the TN Supreme Court for withholding evidence in a capital trial, and yet faces no disciplinary consequences from the DA’s office (Memphis Flyer).

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TEN THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT MASS INCARCERATION

1. What the term means

  • The phrase “mass imprisonment” was coined by sociologist David Garland in 2000 to describe the massive expansion of imprisonment in the US between 1975 and the late 1990s. This new regime of punishment differed in two remarkable ways: 1) the sheer scale and magnitude of the increased use of imprisonment in a departure from historic norms and 2) the systematic imprisonment of whole groups of the population without social scientific evidence that punishment has a strong relationship with crime control.

 2. Scale: There are more than 2.4 million people behind bars in America

  • Approximately one out of every four prisoners on the entire planet are in U.S. prisons, but the United States only accounts for about five percent of the total global population. Since 1980, the number of people incarcerated in U.S. prisons has quadrupled. Incredibly, 41 percent of all young people in America have been arrested by the time they turn 23. 12 million people cycle through prison in a single year. 7 to 8 million people are under some form of criminal justice supervision (including probation and parole).
  • Tennessee incarceration rates have gone from just over 100 people incarcerated per 100,000 people in the 1970s to over 400 in 2010.

 3. Systematic Imprisonment of groups: Mass incarceration disproportionately impacts people of color

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Upcoming Events in Knoxville and Nashville

Knoxville Teach-In on Mass Incarceration

and the Death Penalty

Wednesday, September 10, 7-9pm

University of Tennessee-Knoxville

McClung Tower, Room 1210

UT Knoxville - MASS INCARCERATION TEACH-IN-page-001

Join us for a public event dedicated to a dialogue with university and community members on issues of mass incarceration and capital punishment, regionally and nationally. Speakers will include Stacy Rector, the Executive Director of Tennesseans for Alternatives to the Death Penalty, and Andre Canty of Highlander Center and 100 Black Men of Greater Knoxville.  This event is part of a series of statewide events by Tennessee Students and Educators for Social Justice as Tennessee, in stark contrast to its abolitionist history, moves forward with a schedule to execute 11 people in the next 16 months, beginning in October.
 
 

Nashville Teach-In on Mass Incarceration and the Death Penalty

Saturday, September 13, 10 am – 4:30 pm

Nashville Public Library, Conference Center

615 Church St, Nashville, TN 37219

Directions and Parking Information

Sept 13 Teach-in Poster

This teach-in will cover a range of issues, including private prisons, the school-to-prison pipeline, capital punishment, post-incarceration re-entry, and the criminalization of race, poverty, immigration status, pregnancy outcomes, and non-normative gender and sexuality.  The day-long event will feature workshops from Nashville community organizations, such as Project Return, ACLU of Tennessee, Open Table Nashville, the Tennessee Immigrant and Refugee Rights Coalition, Brown Justice Chasers, Magdalene on the Inside, Tennesseans for Alternatives to the Death Penalty, and the Children’s Defense Fund.  Co-sponsored by the Vanderbilt Prison Project and Tennessee Students and Educators for Social Justice.  Lunch will be provided (RSVP on our facebook event page, or at tnsocialjustice@gmail.com).  Preview a draft program here.
 

Rally to Stop Executions

Monday, Sept 15, 12 noon – 1pm

Legislative Plaza (corner of 6th and Charlotte)

Nashville, TN

Tennessee Students and Educators for Social Justice will send a delegation to deliver our Open Letter to Governor Haslam, asking him to stop currently-scheduled executions and to conduct a full and transparent review of Tennessee’s death penalty system. If you have not already signed our letter, click here to add your signature.

Come out and support our delegation!  Bring signs to express your views and banners to represent your school, college, community group, or congregation!

 
 
 

Mourning Becomes Justice

Guest post by Michelle Brown

This is the irony or paradox. Political resistance could kill you, well actually the state could in response to your resistance, but the beloved community could save you. Not from physical death. Nothing would do that, not even god. But from meaningless death and despair. One does not negotiate with the state’s use of terror, violent and premature death (actual physical death or disappearance through incarceration). One opposes it and in that opposition finds meaning in black suffering.

– Joy James, “Black Suffering in Search of the ‘Beloved Community’”

Criminal justice in the United States is a project that intersects with race and mortality at every intersection. In laying out this claim, of course, I have the killing of Michael Brown in mind and recent events and actions in Ferguson, Missouri. I also situate this present moment within the growing historical record of patterned, racialized state killing. I mean to point to a kind of disturbance that is foundational, ordinary, routine: Mass incarceration and capital punishment are produced through a host of everyday discretionary decision-making and institutional practices that make up criminal justice, creating the conditions for premature death, like that of Michael Brown. To name only a few of these (and to engage them superficially at best), consider the following:

Continue reading